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Original Research 


Pathological and Nonpathological Worry: Their Relationships with Nightmare Frequency

William E. Kelly.

Cited by (1)

Abstract
Objective: Both worry and nightmares are relatively common phenomena and both are conceptually related. However, research investigating their relationship has not been reported. The aim of the current study was to investigate the statistical relationship between worry and nightmare frequency.

Methods: Using a cross-sectional design, university students (N = 134) completed reliable and validated measures of nightmare frequency, trait pathological worry, nonpathological worry, and worry related sleep disturbance.

Results: Higher frequency of nightmares was significantly correlated with higher scores on measures of pathological worry, nonpathological worry, and worry-related sleep disturbance. Using ordinal regression, it was determined that pathological worry, but not nonpathological worry or worry-related sleep disturbance, accounted for significant unique variance in nightmare frequency.

Conclusions: The results were consistent with conceptualizations of pathological worry and nightmare frequency as related to ego functioning and psychological distress. Individuals seeking psychotherapy reporting intense, uncontrollable worry might need to be evaluated for frequent nightmares as well. The results were discussed and suggestions for future research were offered.

Key words: Nightmares, dreams, worry, anxiety, sleep disorders


 
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This Article Cited By the following articles

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Front. Neurol. 2020; 11(): .

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How to Cite this Article
Pubmed Style

William E. Kelly. Pathological and Nonpathological Worry: Their Relationships with Nightmare Frequency. PBS. 2018; 8(1): 1-6. doi:10.5455/jmood.20180204033253


Web Style

William E. Kelly. Pathological and Nonpathological Worry: Their Relationships with Nightmare Frequency. https://www.pbsciences.org/?mno=290110 [Access: April 05, 2022]. doi:10.5455/jmood.20180204033253


AMA (American Medical Association) Style

William E. Kelly. Pathological and Nonpathological Worry: Their Relationships with Nightmare Frequency. PBS. 2018; 8(1): 1-6. doi:10.5455/jmood.20180204033253



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

William E. Kelly. Pathological and Nonpathological Worry: Their Relationships with Nightmare Frequency. PBS. (2018), [cited April 05, 2022]; 8(1): 1-6. doi:10.5455/jmood.20180204033253



Harvard Style

William E. Kelly (2018) Pathological and Nonpathological Worry: Their Relationships with Nightmare Frequency. PBS, 8 (1), 1-6. doi:10.5455/jmood.20180204033253



Turabian Style

William E. Kelly. 2018. Pathological and Nonpathological Worry: Their Relationships with Nightmare Frequency. Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 8 (1), 1-6. doi:10.5455/jmood.20180204033253



Chicago Style

William E. Kelly. "Pathological and Nonpathological Worry: Their Relationships with Nightmare Frequency." Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences 8 (2018), 1-6. doi:10.5455/jmood.20180204033253



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

William E. Kelly. "Pathological and Nonpathological Worry: Their Relationships with Nightmare Frequency." Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences 8.1 (2018), 1-6. Print. doi:10.5455/jmood.20180204033253



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

William E. Kelly (2018) Pathological and Nonpathological Worry: Their Relationships with Nightmare Frequency. Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 8 (1), 1-6. doi:10.5455/jmood.20180204033253