E-ISSN 2636-834X
 

Hypothesis 


Sunglasses may play a role in depression

Mahmut Alpayci, Osman Ozdemir, Seyfettin Erdem, Nazim Bozan, Levent Yazmalar.

Abstract
Proposed causes of winter depression include decrease in amount of sunlight, inability to suppress melatonin production, and finally disruption of circadian rhythms related to sleep/wake cycle in susceptible individuals. Like seasonal effect of sunlight on mood, the mood is also correlated with sunshine hours. The amount of sunlight reaching the brain from the eyes via retinohypothalamic tract is reduced in sunglass users, because sunglasses screen out 75% to 90% of visible light. In people wearing sunglasses, the antidepressant effect of sunlight may be reduced and circadian rhythms may be distorted, possibly leading to the emergence winter depression. Since the sunlight has antidepressant effect and since sunglasses reduce sunlight exposure, we hypothesized that sunglass use may play a role in depression.

Key words: depression, sunglasses; vitamin D


 
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How to Cite this Article
Pubmed Style

Mahmut Alpayci, Osman Ozdemir, Seyfettin Erdem, Nazim Bozan, Levent Yazmalar. Sunglasses may play a role in depression. PBS. 2012; 2(2): 80-83. doi:10.5455/jmood.20120529055051


Web Style

Mahmut Alpayci, Osman Ozdemir, Seyfettin Erdem, Nazim Bozan, Levent Yazmalar. Sunglasses may play a role in depression. https://www.pbsciences.org/?mno=17353 [Access: April 06, 2022]. doi:10.5455/jmood.20120529055051


AMA (American Medical Association) Style

Mahmut Alpayci, Osman Ozdemir, Seyfettin Erdem, Nazim Bozan, Levent Yazmalar. Sunglasses may play a role in depression. PBS. 2012; 2(2): 80-83. doi:10.5455/jmood.20120529055051



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

Mahmut Alpayci, Osman Ozdemir, Seyfettin Erdem, Nazim Bozan, Levent Yazmalar. Sunglasses may play a role in depression. PBS. (2012), [cited April 06, 2022]; 2(2): 80-83. doi:10.5455/jmood.20120529055051



Harvard Style

Mahmut Alpayci, Osman Ozdemir, Seyfettin Erdem, Nazim Bozan, Levent Yazmalar (2012) Sunglasses may play a role in depression. PBS, 2 (2), 80-83. doi:10.5455/jmood.20120529055051



Turabian Style

Mahmut Alpayci, Osman Ozdemir, Seyfettin Erdem, Nazim Bozan, Levent Yazmalar. 2012. Sunglasses may play a role in depression. Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2 (2), 80-83. doi:10.5455/jmood.20120529055051



Chicago Style

Mahmut Alpayci, Osman Ozdemir, Seyfettin Erdem, Nazim Bozan, Levent Yazmalar. "Sunglasses may play a role in depression." Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences 2 (2012), 80-83. doi:10.5455/jmood.20120529055051



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

Mahmut Alpayci, Osman Ozdemir, Seyfettin Erdem, Nazim Bozan, Levent Yazmalar. "Sunglasses may play a role in depression." Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences 2.2 (2012), 80-83. Print. doi:10.5455/jmood.20120529055051



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

Mahmut Alpayci, Osman Ozdemir, Seyfettin Erdem, Nazim Bozan, Levent Yazmalar (2012) Sunglasses may play a role in depression. Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2 (2), 80-83. doi:10.5455/jmood.20120529055051